Category Archives: Public Service

Here’s the Transcript for the Candidates’      Forum on 27th Senatorial District Race…

Click the links below.

Transcript is here:
http://www.malibudemocraticclub.org/website-in-construction/

The endorsement is here:
http://www.malibudemocraticclub.org/wp-admin/post.php?post=1095&action=edit

Videos are below —  shot by Marshall Thompson of PRVideo-TV in Malibu and installed on YouTube.

They may be downloaded here or on YouTube, but original copies are available from PRVideo-TV.

(https://www.youtube.com/user/MalibuVideoPro)

First five installations are the opening statements.  Then there are questions from the moderator to all, then audience questions, and in the last installment (No. 5), final answers to audience questions and closing statements.

 

 

 

 

 

Meet the Candidates and Make Your Mark on Malibu With Your Vote!

Want a chance to help determine the future of Malibu??

What would happen if a large tsunami damaged the nuclear reactor just north of Santa Barbara?   We’re right downstream.

Why are all the starfish gone from our tide pools?

If fracking for oil causes earthquakes, should we keep doing it near fault zones?

And how do you feel about increased traffic along PCH?

We have a chance to select a senator to represent Malibu and nearby areas in the California legislature.– ONE who’ll be making decisions that forever change our lives. Who will you vote for this June?

Come meet the candidates. . . all six Democrats — and ask them what they think.

We’re having a forum at 11:30 a.m., Feb. 20, at the Malibu Public Library. It’s free of charge in the Malibu Civic Center–and there will be refreshments.

That’s 11:30 THIS Saturday, Feb. 20 at the library. Help keep Malibu the beautiful home we all love.

Who will you vote for at the June Primary?
Who will you vote for at the June Primary?

Candidates include Janice Kamenir-Reznik, Shawn Bayliss, Richard Mathews, Henry Stern, David Pollock, and George Christopher Thomas.  (See poster below for photos).
There will be a pot luck display of free snacks and beverages — courtesy the Democratic Club Board of Directors — and the forum will begin after opening remarks.  The event will be moderated by Lance Simmens, a Democratic Club board member who has spent nearly four decades involved in public service at all levels of government.  Simmens directed Gasland Grassroots, an organization devoted to public education on fracking.  He was state director of Citizens Trade Campaign, an agency set up to defeat the Trans Pacific Partnership. He served Gov. Jerry Brown as Deputy Director of Communications for the California High-Speed Rail Authority, and spent fifteen years in Federal service, largely serving in senior intergovernmental affairs positions for four Cabinet Secretaries.
What do these candidates stand for, and who can best represent Malibu?

Following the Forum,  Malibu Democratic Club members will elect officers and board members for 2016 and — depending on attendance — the club may decide to endorse a candidate to represent the 27th Senatorial district.

All incumbent board officers are running to remain in office.  They include Ann Doneen, president; Ted Vaill, vice president; Roy van de Hoek, secretary; Doug Rosen, treasurer.

Board members running to remain in office include all officers plus Dorothy Reik, Jennifer deNicola, Carol Moss, Stephen Frantz, Ph.D., Tracey Burton,  Sam Hall Kaplan,  Marcia Hanscom,

 

Your Help is Urgent

County to rule tomorrow on converting  Santa Monica Mountain land into wineries

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Tomorrow, Tues., Nov.17, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors will decide whether 21,000 spectacular, pristine acres of rugged canyons and sweeping ridgelines will be protected from the threat of new commercial vineyards.

Your action now is crucial; your strong voice is needed to say NO to commercial vineyards in the Santa Monica Mountains North Area Plan (NAP). This is not about garden vineyards.

After residents have spent decades fighting to protect the Santa Monica Mountains, and after  millions of public dollars have been spent in passing County laws to preserving open space and protecting natural landscapes, ​lobbyists and ​special interests from the Central Valley once again are determined to exploit the Santa Monica Mountains.
At stake are huge swaths of native habitat that would be stripped and replaced with non-native, vineyard and crops.

Please join in saying NO to creating a patchwork of vineyard ​commercial ​plantations ​and operations that horribly consume and ​fragment ​the terrain. In addition to killing native plants and animals,  vineyard blight disfigures the landscape and significantly decreases property values and quality of life for adjacent and surrounding communities.   In addition, some nonorganic farmers use rodenticides which have been shown fatal to wildlife and herbicides known to be carcinogens to humans.
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Here is what you can do right now to help:

  1. Cut and paste the email below and send immediately to defendnap@gmail.com. We need as many letters as possible.  Distribute to your friends and neighbors. Every letter counts! Deadline is at 6 p.m. today, Mon, Nov. 16 at 6 p.m.
  2. Attend and speak up at the Board of Supervisors hearing tomorrow, Tues, Nov. 17 at 9:30 a.m. – 500 West Temple Street, Los Angles.

Thank you for caring about our beautiful mountains.

 

Here is the suggested email to cut and paste

Send email to: defendnap@gmail.com      Subject Line of email: SUPPORT ITEM #47. BAN COMMERCIAL VINEYARDS

Honorable Board of Supervisors:

PLEASE SUPPORT ITEM #47.

BAN NEW COMMERCIAL VINEYARDS IN THE SANTA MONICA MOUNTAINS NORTH AREA COMMUNITY STANDARDS DISTRICT PROJECT NO. R2015-02310, ADVANCE PLANNING CASE NO. RQADV201500007, ENVIRONMENTAL CASE NO. REN201500182

I/we strongly support Agenda Item #47 and a Vineyard Ordinance that prohibits new commercial vineyards in the spectacularly wild 21,000 acres comprising the Santa Monica Mountains North Area Plan. Vineyards are a significant and growing threat to our environment, magnificent scenic resources, our fragile wildlife and ecosystem, and to our native habitat, water quality and resources.

Please don’t allow ‘special interests’ to triumph over the best interests of the public and our extraordinarily natural and finite resources.

Sincerely,

Your name/address/affiliation

MEASURE  W FAILS; LANDSLIDE WIN FOR MALIBU’S RURAL CHARACTER

Final vote count is  57.3% No,  42.7% yes

1574 No Votes, 1173 Yes votes

City Council’s four-to-one vote in favor of the development shows that councilmembers do not reflect the will of the people.

Developer Steve Soboroff already has filed a lawsuit saying the vote of the people was illegal.   He contends that the public has no right to prevent him from developing his property as he wishes.

Voters were able to reject the grocery store complex following passage of Measure R, last November’s ballot measure that put Civic Center commercial developments seeking zoning variances up to a vote of residents.

Soboroff’s campaign for voters to approve his plans was seen by residents as the first domino to fall, setting off a chain reaction of massive civic center development.

“Malibu’s identity is that of a natural mountains-meet-the-sea community,” said Ann Doneen, president of the Malibu Democratic Club.  “I think this is a vote to retain character of Malibu, to preserve and protect our mountains and open spaces as much as possible.  That is the reason for the overwhelming success of Measure R one year ago, and that is the reason that Measure W lost this year, even though there was very little campaigning against W.  It helped that the Los Angeles County Democratic Party supported a NO vote on Measure W.  Everyone knew that Malibu’s problem with traffic congestion would be made even worse by such a big development here.

“Even though residents might want to shop at a popular store that features lots of local and organic produce, there was no guarantee that this store actually would be part of the complex.   Clearly,  residents felt the most important issue here was to protect the scenic and environmental nature of the community, which is the reason they bought homes here to begin with.”‘

 

 

 

 

EARLY RETURNS SHOW MEASURE W LOSING BY NARROW MARGIN!

Absentee ballots show No on W votes are leading — marginally — by 51.64% to 48.34% according to, Malibu Radio Kbu-FM.   All five precincts are expected to be counted between 10:00 and 10:30 p.m., Results are unofficial until the city clerk certifies the final tallies.   So far there have been:
707 NO votes 51.64%
662 YES votes 48.36%
1,369 absentee ballots cast out of 8,834 eligible

We’ll update you as soon as results are announced.

 

‘FlameMapper’ simulations may save your home

The pair spoke on Saturday, June 13 at the Malibu Library about their latest findings as guests of the Second Saturday Series of the Malibu Democratic Club. 

Shafer, who retired after 43 years with the Los Angeles County Fire Department, has two master’s degrees and is a longtime Malibu resident. He has extensively studied the wildfires of the Santa Monica Mountains from 1900 to today.

“Virtually every stick between the 101 and the Pacific Ocean has burned at least once or twice in the last 50 years,” Shafer said. “Some areas have burned six or seven times.”

Local wildfires tend to start at or near the 101 Freeway and strong Santa Ana wind conditions drive the flames toward the coast. FlameMapper software incorporates data from the burn paths of every major wildfire in the last 115 years, including many variables, and is now able to simulate the probable paths and speed a fire could take, based on location, wind, humidity, etc.

In detailed studies of the most common paths that fires have taken through the mountains over the years, Shafer noticed something interesting. “I noticed that oak trees next to a structure protected that structure,” he said.

He began building computer simulations of oak tree plantings at various areas on fire paths. The results showed that “the spread of the fire is vastly reduced by oak trees that have the understory (flammable plants growing underneath the tree) removed.”

Shafer noticed while running simulations of past fires that came down Malibu Canyon that there is a narrow “choke point” or “corridor” near Piuma and Malibu Canyon roads that a fire beginning at the 101 has to get through in order to make it all the way into Malibu. He feels that if oak trees were planted at that particular site, it would stop fires on that route from getting into Malibu.

“The Malibu Canyon Corridor has more burnovers than any other place in the Santa Monica Mountains,” Shafer observed. He points out that the past two big fires in that area have gone around Monte Nido — a neighborhood heavily wooded with large oak trees.

“Natural riparian areas (wooded areas next to stream banks) inhibit wildfire spread,” Shafer said. And it’s not just oak trees — he says willow, bay laurel and California sycamore trees also have the same effect. “If you plant riparian areas on the simulator, they have fire-resistant qualities that haven’t been taken advantage of.”

Shafer has also noticed that areas in the Santa Monica Mountains that used to have riparian areas that have since been removed now burn much more readily. “We need to put nature back where it was to prevent fires from spreading to larger areas,” he said.

Part of the FlameMapper solution, Shafer feels, could be building simulator maps for neighborhoods showing the best locations for planting trees or riparian areas as “containment lines” to prevent the spread of fires. He’d also like the City of Malibu to look at points outside the city limits, where plantings would help prevent fires from coming into the city. “The city should be building a fire protection plan for the Civic Center area,” he said.

Shafer emphasized that FlameMapper is on the leading edge of wildfire research in the U.S. “Most research is done by the U.S. government, and they’re only concerned with trees. Very little research is being done on chaparral areas.”

Several members of the audience, including local Dorothy Reik, were so impressed with Shafer’s research, they now plan to work with Broussard on putting together a presentation for Los Angeles County Supervisor Sheila Kuehl, since tree planting projects in the Santa Monica Mountains would fall under her jurisdiction.

Malibu’s Big Rock neighborhood has been one of the early adopters of using FlameMapper as a fire prevention tool. Al Broussard is President of the HOA there and his son, Shea, is co-founder and engineer of FlameMapper. The Boussard family’s house burned down in the 1993 Topanga fire.

Additional information and a number of publicly accessible fire maps are available at flamemapper.com.